Photo Archive

Photos from our recent Cultural Studies Colloquia.

Center for Cultural Studies Events

The Center for Cultural Studies hosts a weekly Wednesday colloquium featuring work by faculty and visitors.

January 14 – Maya Peterson: “The Padishah of the Hungry Steppe: Irrigation and Empire in Russian Turkestan”

January 14 – Maya Peterson: “The Padishah of the Hungry Steppe: Irrigation and Empire in Russian Turkestan”

Maya Peterson’s work stands at the intersection of environmental and imperial history. Her current book project explores the ways in which a focus on the physical environment might open up new avenues for thinking about modernity and colonial relationships in Central Asia under Russian and Soviet rule. She is Assistant Professor of History at UCSC.

January 21 – Naveeda Khan: “The Call to Islam and Early Warning Systems in Bangladesh: The Mutual Absorption of the Political, Religious, and the Natural”

January 21 – Naveeda Khan: “The Call to Islam and Early Warning Systems in Bangladesh: The Mutual Absorption of the Political, Religious, and the Natural”

Naveeda Khan’s work traverses spaces of religious crisis and conflict in urban Pakistan to everyday life on shifting land and emergent perceptions of climate change in riparian Bangladesh.  Her current interest is to explore the physiognomy of the natural from within the social and the theological.  She is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins […]

January 28 – Carolyn Dean: “All that Glitters: Incommensurability in Spanish American Visual Culture”

January 28 – Carolyn Dean: “All that Glitters: Incommensurability in Spanish American Visual Culture”

Carolyn Dean is currently working on a co-authored book project entitled Colonial Things, Cosmopolitan Thinking: Locating the Indigenous Art of Spanish America. Recognizing that the humanistic disciplines have often had an uncomfortable relationship with objects created outside Western traditions, this project seeks to illuminate how indigenous things in the colonial past have been used and […]

February 4 – Madhavi Murty: “The Story about Development: Caste, Religion and Poverty in Post Reform India’s Popular Culture”

February 4 – Madhavi Murty: “The Story about Development: Caste, Religion and Poverty in Post Reform India’s Popular Culture”

Madhavi Murty works in the fields of feminist media studies, gender and globalization, nationalism and South Asian cultural studies. Madhavi is currently working on a book manuscript titled Myths of the Real: Political Economy and the Spectacle of the Ordinary in Post Reform India.  She is Assistant Professor in the Department of Religion and Culture […]

February 11 – Kris Alexanderson: “Japanese Penetration and Dutch Conciliation: Transoceanic Politics in Maritime Asia during the 1930s”

February 11 – Kris Alexanderson: “Japanese Penetration and Dutch Conciliation: Transoceanic Politics in Maritime Asia during the 1930s”

Kris Alexanderson’s current book project examines the collaborative efforts of the Netherlands East Indies’ colonial administration, Dutch shipping businesses, and foreign consulates in port cities across the Middle East and Asia in controlling the flow of anti-Western and anti-colonial ideas—including pan-Islamism, Communism, and pan-Asianism. She is Assistant Professor of History at University of the Pacific.

February 18 – Jennifer Horne: “Serial Americans and the ‘Conquest Program'””

February 18 – Jennifer Horne: “Serial Americans and the ‘Conquest Program'””

Jennifer Horne’s work considers the film-program-as-civics-lesson in the context of the American civics movement.  Centering on a film series from 1917, rife with conquesting tropes of manifest destiny, empire and nation, it explores the programming context of the late silent era to theorize seriality as a mode of American visual education.  Jennifer Horne is Assistant […]

February 25 – Gayle Salamon: “The Life and Death of Leticia King”

February 25 – Gayle Salamon: “The Life and Death of Leticia King”

Gayle Salamon is currently working on two manuscripts. The first is an exploration of narrations of bodily pain and disability and is titled Painography: Metaphor and the Phenomenology of Chronic Pain. The second manuscript, Passing Period, analyzes the 2008 classroom shooting of gender-transgressive 15-year-old Leticia King. Gayle Salamon is Associate Professor of English and Gender and Sexuality Studies at Princeton University.

March 4 – Christopher Chen: “Ed Roberson and the Poetics of Serial Identities”

March 4 – Christopher Chen: “Ed Roberson and the Poetics of Serial Identities”

Christopher Chen’s scholarly interests include theories of comparative racialization, racial capitalism and the black radical tradition, and debates over what Charles Taylor and others have called the “politics of recognition.” Christopher is currently working on a book-length comparative study of contemporary African-American and Asian-American experimental or “avant-garde” writing.  Christopher Chen is Assistant Professor of Literature […]

The international field of cultural studies has emerged from the challenges posed to traditional humanistic and social scientific agendas by new research strategies in visual studies; anthropology, ethnography, and folklore; feminist studies; comparative sociology and politics; semiotics; social, cultural, literary, and political theory; science studies; colonial discourse analysis; ethnic studies; and the histories of sexualities. These challenges, and the new areas of scholarly activity they stimulate, compose the heart of cultural studies at UC Santa Cruz.