Of Interest Events for the Week of March 2, 2015

Of Interest Events for the Week of March 2, 2015

 

Tuesday, March 3 / SIKH AND PUNJABI STUDIES / Johanna Ogden / “Mutiny in Oregon: Early Twentieth Century East Indian Radicals and the Birth of the Ghadar Party” / 4:00-5:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Wednesday, March 4 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “The Creators of Shopping Worlds” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

Wednesday, March 4 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Antonella Guidazzoli / “Open Virtual Heritage Applications: From Research Tools to Emotional and Participatory Virtual Spaces” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Thursday, March 5 / PHILOSOPHY IN A MULTICULTURAL CONTEXT / Fabrizzio McManus Guerrero/ “From Queer Theory to Teoría Cuir: Latin American appropriations of Gay Identities” / 12:00-1:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Thursday, March 5 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Maceo Montoya / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Friday, March 6 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Michael Wilson / “Violent Constructions: Classifying, Explaining, and Misrepresenting Contentious Politics” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Friday and Saturday, March 6-7 / CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES / “From Ferguson to Salinas: Intersections Against State-Sanctioned Violence”

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on many “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.
 


 

OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Tuesday, March 3 / SIKH AND PUNJABI STUDIES / Johanna Ogden / “Mutiny in Oregon: Early Twentieth Century East Indian Radicals and the Birth of the Ghadar Party” / 4:00-5:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

The Hindustani Association of the Pacific Coast, better known as the Ghadar Party, was a game-changing development in Indian history. Ghadarites called for and attempted the overthrow of British colonial rule in India during WWI, seeking a caste-free, secular and independent Indian nation. Ghadar was overwhelmingly initiated by and composed of Sikh laborers from the North American West and became a worldwide movement drawn from people of all castes and religions. San Francisco was home to the movement’s public office and its weekly newspaper, Ghadar, and has often been logged as the movement’s birthplace, especially by historians of the North American West. But remote Astoria, Oregon holds this distinction. Drawing on Indian historical accounts, oral histories and Oregon archival materials, Ms. Ogden both repopulates the East Indian community in Oregon and traces reasons for and key moments in Ghadar’s seemingly unlikely genesis there. Her larger interest, however, is exploring the dis-remembering of East Indians in Oregon and the window it provides into the targeting of Arabs, Muslims and South Asians in post-9/11 America.

Johanna Ogden is an independent historian and activist from Oregon. In 2013 she initiated and was the consulting historian for Astoria’s two-day Ghadar Party Centenary Commemoration and in 2014 participated in an international conference on Ghadar in Chandigarh, Punjab. Her most recent publications include the award-winning “Ghadar, Historical Silences & Notions of Belonging” Oregon Historical Quarterly, Summer 2012; “Ghadar’s Oregon Roots,” The Ghadar Movement: Background, Ideology, Action and Legacies (Punjabi Uni: 2013). She is presently writing a book about Ghadar’s roots in Oregon for the University of Washington Press.
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Wednesday, March 4 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA WEDNESDAY NIGHT CINEMA / “The Creators of Shopping Worlds” / 7:00pm / Studio C (Communications 150)

THE CREATORS OF SHOPPING WORLDS (2001, 72 min.)

Brave new shopping worlds are being created. What have mall owners, architects, surveillance technicians, and supermarket workers done to turn human subjects into pure streams of consumers, into the perfect inhabitants of shopping mall paradise?

“…Going to the supermarket is an exercise in predestination: research has proven, as we learn in The Creators of Shopping Worlds, that, “Customers orient themselves horizontally… and vertically they look for a specific item.” The mall planners and bread-display architects seen at work in Harun Farocki’s doc take on the sinister air of a worldwide conspiracy.” –Jessica Winter, Village Voice, October 31st, 2001
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Wednesday, March 4 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Antonella Guidazzoli / “Open Virtual Heritage Applications: From Research Tools to Emotional and Participatory Virtual Spaces” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Antonella Guidazzoli, CINECA Supercomputer Center, Bologna Italy, leads research services for the 3D Virtual Information Research Lab at Italy’s supercomputer center in Bologna, CINECA, a non-profit consortium comprising 69 Italian universities, two national research centers, and the Ministry of Universities and Research. She has done distinguished work in the creation of virtual cultural heritage sites, including a 3D project on the Etruscans that includes an educational video featuring the Etruscan character, Ati: http://www.glietruschielaldila.it

Contact digitalhumanities@ucsc.edu for more details about any of the above events.
Follow @DH_UCSC on Twitter and Digital Humanities at UCSC on Facebook.
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Thursday, March 5 / PHILOSOPHY IN A MULTICULTURAL CONTEXT / Fabrizzio McManus Guerrero/ “From Queer Theory to Teoría Cuir: Latin American appropriations of Gay Identities” / 12:00-1:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Fabrizzio McManus Guerrero studied Biology in the Faculty of Sciences at UNAM from 2000 to 2004 and wrote, as his undergraduate thesis, a taxonomic revision of the genus Jatropha (fam. Euphorbiaceae). From 2004 to 2006 he was a masters student in the Program in Philosophy of Science also at UNAM. There he wrote his master thesis focusing on the philosophical problems of phylogenetic reconstruction. His masters thesis won two prizes: the Norman Sverdlin prize for best philosophy thesis in 2006, and the UNAM prize medal “Alfonso Caso.”He started his doctorate in the same program in 2006. In his dissertation, he analyzed homosexuality in the context of philosophical accounts of mechanistic explanation and biopower. He successfully defended (with honors) his dissertation in November 2010: La homosexualidad a la luz de la filosofía de la ciencia: Mecanismos biologicos, subjetividad y poder (Homosexuality in Light of the Philosophy of Science: Biological Mechanisms, Subjectivity, and Power).

Fabrizzio is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies at UNAM.
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Thursday, March 5 / LIVING WRITERS SERIES / Maceo Montoya / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Maceo Montoya grew up in Elmira, California. He graduated from Yale University in 2002 and received his Master of Fine Arts in painting from Columbia University in 2006. His paintings, drawings, and prints have been featured in exhibitions and publications throughout the country as well as internationally. Montoya’s first novel, The Scoundrel and the Optimist (Bilingual Review, 2010), was awarded the 2011 International Latino Book Award for “Best First Book” and Latino Stories named him one of its “Top Ten New Latino Writers to Watch.” In 2014, University of New Mexico Press published his second novel, The Deportation of Wopper Barraza, and Copilot Press published Letters to the Poet from His Brother, a hybrid book combining images, prose poems, and essays.

Montoya is an assistant professor in the Chicana/o Studies Department at UC Davis where he teaches the Chicana/o Mural Workshop and courses in Chicano Literature. He is also affiliated with Taller Arte del Nuevo Amanecer (TANA), a community-based arts organization located in Woodland, CA.
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Friday, March 6 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Michael Wilson / “Violent Constructions: Classifying, Explaining, and Misrepresenting Contentious Politics” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202
Michael S. Wilson is a Ph.D. student in the Politics Department with an emphasis in Social Documentary. A Mexico City native, he is broadly interested in issues of peace and conflict in Latin America, and his dissertation project is a comparison of social movements emerging against resource extraction in Brazil, Chile, and Peru. In this talk, Michael will explore how three sources of knowledge and information—media, statistics, and qualitative studies—tend to (mis)represent contentious politics.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for Spring quarter contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com
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Friday and Saturday, March 6-7 / CRITICAL RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES / “From Ferguson to Salinas: Intersections Against State-Sanctioned Violence”

March 6, 5:00-8:00 pm / Oakes Learning Center, UCSC
Resisting State Violence in California: Police Brutality and the Prison Industrial Complex

March 7, 10:00am-4:00pm / Resource Center for Nonviolence, 612 Ocean St, Santa Cruz, CA 95060
Ofrenda y altares Workshop, 10-11:30 am
Poetic Imaginaries Against Violence, 12-1:30 pm
Anti-Colonial Walking Tour, 2-5:00 pm

As folks across the country demand justice for Mike Brown and Eric Garner, community members in Salinas, CA are fighting the police murders of Angel Ruiz, 42 (d. March 20, 2014); Osman Hernandez, 26 (d May 9, 2014); Carlos Mejia-Gomez, 44 (d. May 20, 2014); Frank Alvarado, Jr., 39 (d. July 10, 2014); and Jaime Garcia, 35 (d. October 31, 2014). “From Ferguson to Salinas: Intersections Against State-Sanctioned Violence” brings together community members, political organizers, scholars, and artists/poets from across California to discuss the ongoing historical crisis of state-sanctioned violence against people of color and the movement to oppose white supremacist policing in the U.S. We hope to build upon the momentum we’ve witnessed over the last six months as people have taken to the streets to demand justice and offer visions of a world in which black and brown lives matter. We seek an analysis of the historical relationship between anti-black and anti-brown violence in the U.S. in the hopes of strengthening cross-racial solidarities. We seek to raise awareness about the intersections between racialization and economic violence, between police brutality and mass incarceration, and between intimate and state-based gender violence. We are interested in building connections between those who are grieving the loss of their loved ones, those who fight to stay alive despite the injustices of the U.S. justice system, and those who mobilize poetic imaginaries to build the world anew.

For more details see the IHR website.
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