Of Interest Events for the Week of March 9, 2015

Of Interest Events for the Week of March 9, 2015

 

Monday, March 9 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA VISITING ARTIST SERIES / Caroline Martel / “Wavemakers” / 7:00pm / Communications 150 (Studio C)

Wednesday, March 11 / EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / Funie Hsu / “The Coloniality of the English-Only Movement: Race, Language, and Power” / 12:00-1:45pm / McHenry 0266 (Ground Floor)

Thursday, March 12 / SIKH AND PUNJABI STUDIES / Baagi & Hoodini / Sikh Rappers & Social Justice / 6:00-7:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Friday, March 13 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Jessica Calvanico / “Collections of Subjections” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Saturday, March 14 / SHAKESPEARE WORKSHOP / “Shakespeare and Music” / 1:00-4:30pm / Digital Arts Research Center (DARC) Dark Lab, Room 108

 

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* Additional information and regular updates on many “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.


 

OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Monday, March 9 / FILM + DIGITAL MEDIA VISITING ARTIST SERIES / Caroline Martel / “Wavemakers” / 7:00pm / Communications 150 (Studio C)

Caroline Martel has been synthesizing documentary theory and practice for over a decade, with a special interest in archives, invisible histories, and audio/visual technologies and heritage. Martel is an award-winning documentary filmmaker, artist and researcher whose work has been presented to critical acclaim internationally in diverse venues such as at the Toronto International Film Festival, the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam (IDFA), on SRC, NHK, and SVT, at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and at the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. Her first feature documentary, The Phantom of the Operator, showed in more than fifty international festivals, and was reviewed by Variety as “… an enormously imaginative documentary … an hour of nonstop visual and intellectual stimulation.” Martel was one of the featured guests at the 57th Robert Flaherty Seminar. Her first gallery show, the montage installation Industry/Cinema, was presented at the Museum of the Moving Image in New York in 2012.

Integrating vérité, never-before-seen archival material, and an entrancing soundtrack, Wavemakers (2012, 97 min.) explores the origins and workings of the ondes Martenot, an electronic instrument of such extraordinary sensitivity that nearly a century after its invention, musicians, artisans, and scientists are still trying to unravel its secrets. A modern-day story set against a historical background, Wavemakers is a journey into the very heart of the mystery of music.

Free and Open to the Public
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Wednesday, March 11 / EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / Funie Hsu / “The Coloniality of the English-Only Movement: Race, Language, and Power” / 12:00-1:45pm / McHenry 0266 (Ground Floor)

This talk situates the English-Only movement within the theoretical framework of coloniality, to demonstrate not only the colonial legacies of English-Only, as Donaldo Macedo (2000) has argued, but to also illuminate how dimensions of colonial power persist beyond the official time and spaces of formal colonial administration and shape contemporary language instruction discourse. Drawing from a combination of memos from colonial administrators, reports of the War Department, educational reports, political cartoons and other primary sources, this talk pays special attention to the historical cases of settler and overseas colonialism as enacted through English instruction policies directed for Native American, Filipino, and Puerto Rican populations. It concludes with a discussion of the implications of coloniality and the English-Only movement and highlights the need for anti-colonial and liberatory English instruction practices.

Funie Hsu, Ph.D. is a University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the UC Davis School of Education. She received her Ph.D. from the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Education in Policy Organization Measurement and Evaluation with a Designated Emphasis in Women, Gender and Sexuality.
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Thursday, March 12 / SIKH AND PUNJABI STUDIES / Baagi & Hoodini / Sikh Rappers & Social Justice / 6:00-7:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Sikh hip-hop artists Baagi and Hoodini will explore facets of the immigrant and minority experience in multicultural America, in an evening of music, poetry and collective discussion.

Baagi—“Babbey nu Kanna, Gaggay nu Bihari.” In spelling the word “Baagi,” the celebration of a rebellious Punjabi heritage is reborn. Baagi is one of the few artists to rap exclusively in Panjabi. Born and raised in Bombay until moving to Los Angeles in his early teens, Baagi brings a unique perspective both to Hip-Hop and to the evolution of Punjabi culture. A childhood passion for composing Punjabi poetry coupled with his love for Hip-Hop eventually turned an after-school hobby into a career of expression. This artist uses Farsi, Hindi and Panjabi vocabulary to add a new voice to the musical conglomerate. Baagi uses his platform to paint pictures of social issues, easygoing personal anecdotes, and day-to-day experiences, as seen through the lens of a young man influenced by the intersections of many worlds. His debut album, titled Baagi Di Vaari, is available for free download at http://beabaagi.bandcamp.com. You can follow him on Twitter @BaagiMedia.

Hoodini—Hoodini, also known as Hoodeez the Hindoo, has been hailed as “one of the most lyrical and charismatic emcees of South Asian descent” by critics. The poet and Hip-Hop artist combines witty wordplay, lyrical agility, and keen storytelling to present a novel narrative to his audience with natural ease. In listening to a Hoodini record, you may easily find yourself migrating from a commentary on issues of race relations to a jaunty reminiscence of a past love interest, often within the same verse. Hoodeez has released four studio albums to date and has shared the stage with notable Hip-Hop artists including Blu, Pacific Division, Skeme, and RZA of the Wu-Tang Clan. You can keep up with his latest works at http://HoodiniDidIt.com and on Twitter @HoodiniDidIt.
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Friday, March 13 / FRIDAY FORUM FOR GRADUATE RESEARCH / Jessica Calvanico / “Collections of Subjections” / 12:00-1:30pm / Humanities 1, Room 202

Jessica Calvanico is a first year doctoral student in Feminist Studies. She is interested in critical prison studies, performance, ethnography, homosociality and visual culture. Her current work looks at corporeal subjection and the politics of collecting, owning and viewing these forms of subjection. She is also working on an ongoing performance project entitled AVALON, exploring utopia and homosocial space.

The Friday Forum is a graduate-run colloquium dedicated to the presentation and discussion of graduate student research. The series will be held weekly from 12:00 to 1:30PM and will serve as a venue for graduate students in the Humanities, Social Sciences, and Arts divisions to share and develop their research. Light refreshments will be available.

For more info, or to inquire about joining the roster of presenters for Spring quarter contact: fridayforum.ucsc@gmail.com
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Saturday, March 14 / SHAKESPEARE WORKSHOP / “Shakespeare and Music” / 1:00-4:30pm / Digital Arts Research Center (DARC) Dark Lab, Room 108

Shakespeare is famous for his speeches, but the London theaters where his plays took place were also filled with music. “Shakespeare and Music” is a symposium exploring the popular music of Renaissance England, the practice of vocal and instrumental music in Shakespeare’s plays, and Shakespeare’s meditation on music as a metaphor for his art and its effects. Featuring a keynote address by Ross Duffin, The Fynette H. Kulas Professor of Music at Case Western University and author of Shakespeare’s Songbook (W.W. Norton 2004). Free and open to the public.

Panelists:
Ross Duffin: “Reconstructing Shakespeare’s Songbook”
Samuel Arkin: “Shakespeare’s Music and Shylock’s Ears”
Ariane Helou: “Shakespeare’s Singers”

The symposium is held in conjunction with “Treasures from the Age of Shakespeare”, a performance of the Baltimore Consort for the Santa Cruz Baroque Festival at 7:30pm in the UCSC Music Recital Hall (Tickets: scbaroque.org/tickets).
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