Of Interest Events for Week of May 4, 2015

Of Interest Events for Week of May 4, 2015

 

Monday, May 4 / CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES / Sanchita Saxena / “Made in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Sri Lanka: The Labor Behind the Global Garments and Textiles Industries” / 12:00-1:30pm / College 8, Room 201

Monday, May 4 / ANTHROPOLOGY COLLOQUIA / Dr. Tsim D. Schneider / “Indigenous Hinterlands in Colonial San Francisco Bay Area, California” / 3:15-5:00pm / Social Sciences, Room 261

Wednesday, May 6 / SCIENCE & JUSTICE / Ruha Benjamin & Charis Thompson / “Good Science/People’s Science: An Exploration of Science and Justice” / 1:00-4:00pm / University Center, Alumni Room

Wednesday, May 6 / VISUAL & MEDIA CULTURES COLLOQUIA / Pamela M. Lee / “Pattern Recognition, c. 1947” / 4:00-6:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

Wednesday, May 6 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Patrick Murray-John / “Latent Data: How, Where, And Why (Digital) Humanists Discover Data Hidden In Plain Sight” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

Thursday, May 7 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Jared Harvey, Gabriela Ramirez-Chavez, Whitney De Vos, Nicholas James Whittington, Eric Sneathen / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Thursday, May 7 / CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES / “Working for Dignity: The Santa Cruz County Low-Wage Worker Study, Photo Exhibit, and Community Dialog” / 7:00-9:00pm / Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History

 

* To advertise your unit or department’s event in the “Of Interest” section of this weekly bulletin, please e-mail complete event information in text format (no PDFs) to cult@ucsc.edu no later than noon on Friday of the prior week.

* Additional information and regular updates on “Of Interest” events can be found on the IHR website.

 


OF-INTEREST EVENT DESCRIPTIONS:

Monday, May 4 / CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES / Sanchita Saxena / “Made in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Sri Lanka: The Labor Behind the Global Garments and Textiles Industries” / 12:00-1:30pm / College 8, Room 201

Join Sanchita Saxena as she discusses her new book, Made in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Sri Lanka: The Labor Behind the Global Garments and Textiles Industries, which earned rave reviews from leading experts. It is essential reading for students and researchers in policy studies, labor studies, South and Southeast Asian studies, international trade, and political science, as well as those engaged in program design and evaluation of projects focused on labor rights. This study is critical for non-governmental organizations with a thematic focus on the garments and textiles industry, labor rights, human rights, and international trade policy, as well as for private sector organizations focused on improving labor conditions around the world.

Prior to joining the Institute for South Asia Studies (ISAS) at UC Berkeley, Sanchita Banerjee Saxena was the assistant director of Economic Programs at the Asia Foundation, where she coauthored The Phase-Out of the Multi-Fiber Arrangement: Policy Options and Opportunities for Asia, served as a consultant to the Asia Foundation on various economic projects, and was a Public Policy Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington D.C. Saxena holds a PhD in political science from UCLA.

Co-Sponsored by the Anthropology and Economics Departments along with the Center for Labor Studies and the Interdisciplinary Development Working Group
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Monday, May 4 / ANTHROPOLOGY COLLOQUIA / Dr. Tsim D. Schneider / “Indigenous Hinterlands in Colonial San Francisco Bay Area, California” / 3:15-5:00pm / Social Sciences, Room 261

From 1776 to the 1830s, Native people throughout California entered or resisted Spanish missions. For the San Francisco Bay area, resistance often involved running away, approved furloughs administered by some padres, and other thoughtful departures that reactivated threatened places and practices. Following the mission period, Native people continued to meaningfully construct places while also contributing to new economic opportunities emerging across a shifting colonial landscape. This talk presents ongoing archaeological, historical, and collections-based research directed at identifying and investigating such places and practices, including sites of refuge and the opportunities that emerged along coastal Marin County during the 1840s and afterward.
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Wednesday, May 6 / SCIENCE & JUSTICE / Ruha Benjamin & Charis Thompson / “Good Science/People’s Science: An Exploration of Science and Justice” / 1:00-4:00pm / University Center, Alumni Room

As part of the Science and Justice Research Center’s efforts to develop analytics for understanding and enacting ‘science and justice,’ we will be hosting a half-day long symposium that features the work of Charis Thompson (Chancellor’s Professor and Chair of Gender & Women’s Studies, UC Berkeley) and Ruha Benjamin (Assistant Professor in the Center for African American Studies, Princeton University). In their respective works, Good Science: The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Science; People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier,Thompson and Benjamin provide us with a good starting point for our collective efforts to conceptualize and enact ‘science and justice.’ Join us in the discussion with a response from Julie Harris-Wai (Assistant Professor, UC San Francisco and Associate Director of CT2G).

Please register for the event on the S&J website.
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Wednesday, May 6 / VISUAL & MEDIA CULTURES COLLOQUIA / Pamela M. Lee / “Pattern Recognition, c. 1947” / 4:00-6:00pm / Porter College, Room D245

Pamela M. Lee is professor of Art History at Stanford University. Lee received her B.A from Yale University and her Ph.D in the Department of Fine Arts from Harvard University. She also studied at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program. Her area is the art, theory and criticism of late modernism and contemporary art. Among other journals, her work has appeared in October, Artforum, Assemblage, Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics, Les Cahiers du Musee national d’arte moderne, Grey Room, Parkett and Texte zur Kunst. Lee has published four books in addition to journal articles, reviews and catalogue essays. Three books have appeared with the MIT Press: Object to be Destroyed: The Work of Gordon Matta-Clark (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2000); Chronophobia: On Time in the Art of the 1960s (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2004) and Forgetting the Art World (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 2012) Another book New Games: Postmodernism after Contemporary Art was published by Routledge in 2012. Lee is currently working on a book called Think Tank Aesthetics: Mid-Century Modernism, The Cold War and the Rise of Visual Culture.
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Wednesday, May 6 / DIRECTIONS IN DIGITAL HUMANITIES / Patrick Murray-John / “Latent Data: How, Where, And Why (Digital) Humanists Discover Data Hidden In Plain Sight” / 5:00-7:00pm / Humanities 1, Room 210

In this talk, Murray-John will argue that data and the humanities have long held a close and fruitful interrelationship. Data in humanities research is not new; it is the capacity of new technology to do more with data that creates a sense of difference, possibility, and even anxiety. This talk will begin by looking at centuries-old treatment of data in the humanities, and explore how humanists are rediscovering the data in their corporations.
Dr. Patrick Murray-John is a Research Assistant Professor and Omeka Developer Manager at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. He has a B.S. in Mathematics from Iowa State University, and an M.A. in English Literature and Ph.D. in Anglo-Saxon Literature from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Besides helping to develop Omeka, he uses it and other tools to experiment with making data part of public humanities projects. A recent project of his, the US Museums Explorer, an Omeka site built on data released by the Institute for Museum and Library Services, was recently cited as an example of using open data in the Center For the Future of Museums’ “Trends Watch 2015″.
This event is targeted to tool developers, researchers, librarians, archivists, instructors, and graduate students from across the UC system. The event is open to all interested and will be especially of interest to those already working in Omeka to develop digital asset libraries, curate research material, teach visual arts, or cultivate digital literacies.
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Thursday, May 7 / LIVING WRITER SERIES / Jared Harvey, Gabriela Ramirez-Chavez, Whitney De Vos, Nicholas James Whittington, Eric Sneathen / 6:00-7:45pm / Humanities Lecture Hall, Room 206

Jared Harvey is a an author of several chapbooks, including Commuting: Have Gone to Ithaca. – Frank Quitely, Hosni Mubarak, Mammal, and his most recent chapbook Here You Are (co-authored with Sara Peck.

Gabriela Ramirez-Chavez is a Guatemalan-American poet originally from Los Angeles, California. Gaby’s work has appeared in Plath Profiles, Kweli, and The Acentos Review. Her graduate research at UCSC is focused on literature by Central Americans and US Central Americans about the state violence and forced disappearances in the isthmus in the 1970s and 1980s, and the ongoing struggle for justice.

Whitney De Vos has been recognized for her poetry with numerous honors, and is a PhD student at UC Santa Cruz concentrating on 20th and 21st century American poetry, poetics, and politics.

Nicholas James Whittington was born and raised in the City of San Francisco. He is currently a PhD student at UCSC and the editor at AMERARCANA: The Bird & Beckett Review, a serial publication of poetry, creative & critical prose, other words & works of art.

Eric Sneathen lives in Santa Cruz, California, where he is studying for his PhD in Literature. His reviews have been published by Small Press Distribution and Tripwire, and his poetry has been published by Mondo Bummer, The Equalizer, and Faggot Journal.
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Thursday, May 7 / CENTER FOR LABOR STUDIES / “Working for Dignity: The Santa Cruz County Low-Wage Worker Study, Photo Exhibit, and Community Dialog” / 7:00-9:00pm / Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History

This campus-community event will showcase the findings of a year-long research and multi-media project on workers and working conditions in low-wage jobs in Santa Cruz County. We will unveil a new public digital exhibit and website featuring stories told by local workers, as well as the results of the large-scale survey and interview project carried out by UC Santa Cruz students. Workers and students will also share their stories and art work. The event will conclude with an open community dialog on issues facing low-wage workers in our County and possible steps forward.

Sponsored by the UCSC Center for Labor Studies, Chicano Latino Research Center, Everett Program, Institute for Humanities Research, Division of Social Sciences, UC Humanities Research Institute, California Rural Legal Assistance, Santa Cruz Day Worker Center, and the Museum of Art and History.

Refreshments will be served. This event is free and open to the public.

For more information click here or contact Alina Fernandez (aifernan@ucsc.edu) and Steve McKay (smckay@ucsc.edu)
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